North Dakota RTP in Jeopardy - Please Help

Share on Facebook
June 17, 2013 9:57 AM


Dear BRC Action Alert Subscriber in North Dakota,

This comes to us from Sno-Dak (Snowmobile North Dakota) via the Coalition for Recreational Trails.

Snowmobile enthusiasts in North Dakota have just heard from Governor Dalrymple’s office that a meeting is scheduled for July 9th to determine whether or not he will opt out of the Recreational Trails Program (RTP) for the next fiscal year.

If the Governor does not opt out, North Dakota trails will receive slightly more than $1 million in RTP funding next year. If he does opt out, your gas tax you spend on your snowmobile and OHV will be spent for other purposes!

Now is the time for North Dakota trail interests to contact the Governor and let him know how important the RTP is to the future of trails in the state.

Sno-Dak has a really cool action item on their website to help you write Governor Dalrymple. Please use their action item or write your own letter and send it to the Governor today!

Save the Recreational Trail Program (Click here)

We've also pasted Sno-Dak's sample letter below.

As always, please call or email if you have any questions or need additional information.

Thanks in advance for taking action!
Brian Hawthorne
Public Lands Policy Director
BlueRibbon Coalition
208-237-1008 ext 102


Office of Governor Jack Dalrymple
Dept. 101
600 E. Boulevard Ave.
Bismarck, ND 58505-0001
Fax: 701/328-2205

Dear Governor Dalrymple,

I am writing to you to encourage you NOT to opt out of the Recreational Trails Program.

The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) funds the development and maintenance of recreational trails and facilities for motorized and non-motorized uses including hiking, bicycling, equestrian use, dirt bike riding, ATV riding, and other recreational uses.  The program derives its funding from only a portion (less than 50%) of the Federal gas taxes collected at the pump when off-highway recreation enthusiasts fill up their machines.  The RTP is based on the user-pay, user-benefit philosophy as taxes collected on fuel used on trails benefit trails.  By statute 30% of the funds are to be used for motorized recreation, 30% for non-motorized recreation, with the remaining 40% to be used for multiple-use projects.  RTP was created by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) and has been subsequently included in each succeeding transportation reauthorization legislation, including the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) signed by the President in July 2012. 

Key Reasons for a State NOT to Opt Out of the Recreational Trails Program

  • The state will lose access to significant additional dollars in partner funding, including additional funds from non-DOT Federal partners, as well as in-kind services, including the work of volunteers, that RTP funding has traditionally leveraged to support RTP-funded projects.
  • Projects in the state will no longer be exempt from treatment as projects on a Federal-aid highway, which will mean increased costs.
  • The state will lose the funding flexibility allowed by RTP and will be unable to spend funds directly for state-approved projects.
  • Nonprofit organizations and other private-sector partners will no longer be eligible to receive direct funding from the state, limiting a key means of cost-effective project management.
  • Funding of trail maintenance and program administration will no longer be authorized.
  • The state Recreational Trails Advisory Committee, representing all state trail users in the oversight and planning of projects, will be essentially eliminated and the value of the members’ cooperation and input will be lost.
  • Federal support will be lost for key programs like the RTP database and technical assistance, research and training directly related to the program’s administration, which are all underwritten by a return to the DOT of one percent of state RTP funds.
  • The clear link between the RTP, which is funded by Federal gas taxes, and the trail enthusiasts, who pay those taxes, will be lost, denying those users the assurance that benefits they paid for will be received.
    RTP is the foundation for state trail programs across the country. Its loss would seriously damage, if not destroy, a state trail program.  RTP is a flexible, responsive, proven program that leverages hundreds of millions of dollars of additional support from other sources for trails, encourages productive cooperation among trail users, and facilitates healthy outdoor recreation and associated, badly needed economic activity in countless communities.  There are thousands of great RTP projects across the country.  For examples, visit
October 2, 2015 11:12 AM
CALIFORNIA - BLM Reopens Public Comment Period for Draft West Mojave Planning Ar
On March 6, 2015, the Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), published in the Federal Register a notice of availability for comment on a Draft Land Use Plan Amendment (LUPA) and Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the West Mojave Route Network Project (WMRNP) for the West Mojave (WEMO) Planning Area of the California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA), to amend the Motor Vehicle, Recreation, and Grazing Elements
October 1, 2015 3:32 PM
CALIFORNIA - Plumas NF Announces Proposed Action for Over-Snow Vehicle Use Desig
The Forest Service will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on a proposal to designate over-snow vehicle (OSV) use on roads, trails and areas on lands within the Plumas National Forest. The EIS will also identify snow trails available for grooming on the Forest. Public input on the initial proposed action is encouraged. Designating OSV use on the Forest will ensure over-snow vehicle activity (such as snowmobile riding) is effectively managed to: provide access;
September 30, 2015 4:18 PM
UTAH - BLM Seeks Public Comment on Draft Resource Management Plans
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah St. George Field Office is now accepting public comments on a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) analyzing two Draft Resource Management Plans (RMPs) and a Draft Amendment to the current St. George Field Office RMP. On March 20, 2009, the President signed into law H.R. 146, the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009, which created the Red Cliffs and Beaver Dam Wash National Conservation Areas (NCAs)
[Action Alerts Archive]